try-and-touch-my-asymptote:

scienceisbeauty:

One of the answers to the topic: Visually stunning math concepts which are easy to explain at Mathematics Stack Exchange.

I think if you look at this animation and think about it long enough, you’ll understand:
Why circles and right-angle triangles and angles are all related
Why sine is opposite over hypotenuse and so on
Why cosine is simply sine but offset by pi/2 radians


This is also why radians are more superior than degrees.

try-and-touch-my-asymptote:

scienceisbeauty:

One of the answers to the topic: Visually stunning math concepts which are easy to explain at Mathematics Stack Exchange.

I think if you look at this animation and think about it long enough, you’ll understand:

  • Why circles and right-angle triangles and angles are all related
  • Why sine is opposite over hypotenuse and so on
  • Why cosine is simply sine but offset by pi/2 radians

This is also why radians are more superior than degrees.

(via visualizingmath)

kateoplis:

Smithsonian

some insanely beautiful photos here! 

good lord whyyy

(via elysemarshall)

kateoplis:

NPR covers all 2,428 miles of the U.S.-Mexico border, so you don’t have to.

The results are beautiful.

This Is Your Brain on Engineering on Wired Video

goldieblox continuing to kill it.

This Is Your Brain on Engineering on Wired Video

goldieblox continuing to kill it.

jtotheizzoe:

staceythinx:

Spectacular starry nights by photographer Michael Shainblum

Well then… isn’t that nice?

Stardust watching stardust.

I am reading a book now called The End of Night and the light pollution I’m constantly surrounded by makes me sad that I can’t even see 10% of this on a normal night. We need to preserve the places where this can be seen. 

Science works on the frontier between knowledge and ignorance. We’re not afraid to admit what we don’t know – there’s no shame in that. The only shame is to pretend that we have all the answers. Neil deGrasse Tyson adds to history’s finest definitions of science in the second episode of his Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey, reminding us that the art of not-knowing drives science.   (via explore-blog)